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Day-Care Essentials

Day-Care Essentials

If your child is about to start day care, it can be an exciting time but also a stressful time. Getting organized can help make the experience a little less anxiety-provoking for you and your child. First, label everything from blankets and clothing to sippy cups and diaper cream. Check with your day-care provider, but it’s likely you will need to send the following:

  • At least two complete changes of clothing including footwear if old enough to go outdoors
  • Extra blankets and sheets
  • Several bibs
  • Plastic bags for soiled clothes
  • Enough diapers, wipes, creams or ointments to cover a change every 2 hours or so
  • Comfort measures, such as a favorite stuffed animal, teething rings or pacifiers
  • Photos of you and your family to be displayed in your child’s crib

Remember to pack enough formula, expressed breast milk or baby food. Purified, steam-distilled water, such as Nursery®, can be sent to mix with formula and cereal and can be offered to children older than six months.

https://www.care.com/c/stories/3444/your-day-care-backpack/

https://www.childcarenetwork.com/Programs/Daycare_Baby_Packing_List

Preschool Bound

Preschool Bound

Mother was right and research shows children who eat a healthy breakfast concentrate and function better in school and have healthier body weights. Lunch is also important to sustain energy throughout the day and during afterschool activities. Here are some ideas that will increase the odds of your child eating what you pack:

  • Let your child pick out his own lunchbox or insulated lunch bag
  • Allow children to help prepare their own lunches the night before
  • Stock up with healthy options such as whole grain breads, almond butter, light tuna, lean meats, eggs, low-fat yogurt, cottage cheese and hummus
  • Guide children to pick a variety of foods from the five food groups which include vegetables, fruits, grains, low-fat dairy and protein

Calcium is important for growing children. Encourage them to drink milk with lunch by packing a container or sending milk money. Low-fat chocolate milk can be offered as a treat. If your child refuses to drink milk, offer 100% fruit juice fortified with calcium and Vitamin D. Also, pack a water bottle so your child learns to reach for water to quench thirst between meals.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/nutrition/Pages/Breakfast-for-Learning.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradeschool/nutrition/Pages/Making-Healthy-Food-Choices.aspx

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/pages/back-to-school-tips.aspx

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/AAP-Recommends-Whole-Diet-Approach-to-Children's-Nutrition.aspx

Pregnancy / Hydration

Pregnancy / Hydration

The warm, sunny days of summer beckon all of us outdoors, but pregnant women need to be careful as they can easily become dehydrated in heat and humidity. Dehydration during pregnancy increases the risk for low amniotic fluid, premature labor and difficulty with milk production. So, be aware of these signs of dehydration:

  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Racing heart
  • Small amounts of dark urine
  • Constipation

The Institute of Medicine recommends pregnant women drink about 10 cups of fluid daily and breast-feeding women consume about 13 cups each day. One way to make sure you are well hydrated is to glance at your urine. It should be very pale or colorless. While fluid intake can come from a variety of foods and beverages, plain drinking water is one of the best ways to consume fluid as it has no calories.

http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancy-complications/dehydration-pregnancy/

http://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/oligohydramnios.aspx

https://www.nap.edu/read/10925/chapter/6#152

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256?p=1

Water Safety for Babies and Toddlers

Water Safety for Babies and Toddlers

Children of all ages love beach days or play dates at the pool. But, be aware that drownings are a leading cause of death for children between the ages of 1 and 4. Here are a few tips to help keep your little one safe when in or around water:

  • Practice “touch supervision” with children under age 5 – always be within an arm’s length with full attention on child
  • Never leave child alone even for a minute when in water, including a bathtub
  • Learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
  • Keep a life jacket, shepherd’s crook or safety ring with rope at poolside
  • Install a four-sided, self-latching fence around home pool
  • Install an underwater motion swimming pool alarm or have your child wear an alarm that attaches to their wrist like a wristwatch
  • Teach children to wear life jackets when on boats, docks or near bodies of water

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says there is no evidence that swimming lessons prevent drownings in babies younger than age 1, but older babies may be at less risk if they have had some formal instruction.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/injuries-emergencies/Pages/Drowning.aspx

https://www.cdc.gov/safechild/drowning/

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-play/Pages/Water-Safety-And-Young-Children.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/news/Pages/Summer-Safety-Tips-Sun-and-Water-Safety.aspx

https://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/water-safety/waterinjuries-factsheet.html

http://www.webmd.com/children/features/new-pool-safety-gadgets-help-prevent-drowning#1